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Civil rights icon and political power Charles Evers dead at 97

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Charles Evers (Photo by U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kevin S. O'Brien - This Image was released by the United States Navy with the ID 091009-N-5549O-035, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=82928515)
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Charles Evers passed away at his Rankin County home this morning, according to WLBT.

Evers was the older brother of slain civil rights leader Medgar Evers. Charles Evers reportedly recruited his younger brother into the movement. Evers was elected Mayor of Fayette in 1969 making him the first black mayor in the state following reconstruction.

In recent years he owned and operated WMPR radio in Jackson along with his daughter. It was on this platform that Evers hosted a hugely popular talk show. Political figures from both side of the isle sought his counsel and endorsement.

President John F. Kennedy (center) visits with Myrlie Evers (far left), widow of civil rights leader, Medgar Evers. Also pictured: Reena and Darrell Evers, children of Medgar and Myrlie; Charles Evers (far right), brother of Medgar. An unidentified man stands in back at right. Oval Office, White House, Washington, D.C. (Photo by Cecil Stoughton. White House Photographs. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston – https://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Archives/JFKWHP-1963-06-21-C.aspx, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=77252426)

Vicksburg Mayor George Flaggs Jr. was shocked when heard the news a short while ago.

“I knew he was in failing health,” he said. “We tried to get him to the capital for the flag ceremony, and his health wouldn’t allow it. I have known him my entire political career. He was a unique, very effective political leader. He represented and
served his constituents well. My heart, thoughts and prayers go out to his family and friends. We have truly lost a part of Mississippi’s history with his passing.”

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